Descendants of Samuel Seeney

Notes


1. Samuel Seeney

Interview with Sarah Seeney Sullivan at her home at Cheswold, DE 2/12/99. Sarah provided FHSeeney's lineage back to Samuel -- other than mention of Samuel Seeney, there was no proof offered that Samuel married Rhoda.

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http://members.aol.com/DL7715/Seeney.html

The families that most of the Seeneys married into were of mixed racial lines, such as the Deans, Honeys, Grenages, Durhams and Moors. Some descendants have proudly proclaimed their mixed heritage of White, African-American, Delaware Indian and Moor. Others apparently have not.
You can read about these families at the Mitsawokett Main Page website. It is very interesting reading.

The origin of the non-white Moors/Moores of Maryland and Delaware begins back in the 1600s. For a number of great newspaper articles about them you should visit The Delaware Moors. Or read about the beginnings of the area they lived in by going to the Mitsawoket/Cheswold Community pages.

One great story passed down (Terry note -- a fanciful story) is about an English Infantry Regiment called "Kirke's Lambs" stationed in Tangiers, Morocco. In 1684 they were downsized by the British Army. And for some reason a lot of them decided to head for the colonies instead of returning home. (Visit the site called Kirke's Lambs for their complete history.)

They ended up taking over an island in the Chesapeake Bay and called it Tangier Island. The British ex-soldiers brought with them Moorish wives, girlfriends and probably servants and/or slaves. The single Moors migrated into Maryland Eastern Shore area and Delaware usually marrying Indians or Free Blacks. Whereas the ones that were married to the British ex-soldiers in some cases had non-white looking offspring that carried English surnames. (Morgan, Ridgeway, Durham, Dean, Carney). Depending on the marriages in later generations the complexions grew lighter or darker. So by the 1800s census takers made the decision as to list them as White, Non-White, Black or Indian.

Rhoda's grandson, James said that his grandmother had been white. But, a story passed down from the same generation said that an ancester was a Moorish prince that had been held as a slave.

There was a book written in the 1940s that had information about the Delaware Seeneys. It was called Delaware's Forgotten Folk written by Dr. Clinton A. Weslager.

--------------

See notes for wife.


Rhoda Moore

Subj: [Mitsawokett] Question about the Seeneys
Date: 99-03-29
From: calexeditor@nucleus.com (Deborah Cavel-Greant)

I've looked at all the Seeney lines on Betty and Ray's site and can't find anything on this particular line. I'm interested in the identity of the 'Clark' mother of this SDA Seeney family, as I have a sneaking suspicion she may be a direct link to my grandfather because...

My grandad Henry Calvin Clark (who lived in Indian Territory) visited his (Western) Delaware relatives near Chickasha OK c 1910 and came back 'convicted' (an SDA term) of the 7th-Day Sabbath, which he then 'kept holy' until he died 25 years later. He never set foot in an Adventist Church, nor
had any knowledge of any of the other doctrines of the church as far as I know. Just that one outstanding 'Sabbath' thing - the most prominent doctrine of the church.

From this and numerous other bits of information about the Clark family in DE that he wrote down and passed on we know he had at least second-hand contact with the family left behind by his grandfather in Sussex Co. in 1806.

From Weslager's description of James Seeney Jr's family I have constructed a rough 'tree'.

---------------

? Seeney married Rhoda Moore (of Cheswold)

Their son; James Seeney Sr. married ? Clark (estimated d.o.b. 1840?)

Their sons:
John
Samuel
Federick - the orginal SDA convert in 1905
William
James Jr. still living 1941 (Weslager says he was an old man)
Joseph

One of these men had a son named Rueben and a grandson named Dalton, who
was 18 in 1941, according to Weslager. James Jr. is refered to as Dalton's
great-uncle.

---------------

Welcome to the SEENEY Homepage http://members.aol.com/DL7715/Seeney.html
Updated 12/12/98

A Brief Family Tree:

Rhoda was born about 1785 in Delaware and died after 1860 in Delaware. She was married to a Seaney about 1804. Her husband apparently died prior to 1840. Unfortunately his first name is still unknown. She was listed as mulatto in the 1850 and 1860 Censuses.

Their children appear to be : Isaac, Washington, James, Samuel, Jane, Rebecca and an unknown male born about 1832.

Isaac was born about 1804 and married a Jane -?- about 1830. Emma appears to be their daughter.

Washington was born about 1815 and died after 1860. He married Susanna Honey July 20,1840 in Kent County, Delaware. Their children were Thomas, Jane, John, Ellen and Susan. In the 1860 Census his wife is named Catherine and is 5 years older than him. His last name is spelled Seana and he is listed as White.

Samuel was born 1820. He was still living in 1878 in Blackbird Station, New Castle County, Delaware. He married Rebecca Honey March 13,1839 in Smyna, Kent County, Delaware. Their children were Martha, Ann E., James, Rebecca J., John, Mary Ellen and Luther. In the 1850 and 1860 Census the family is listed as White. (Luther died in the infamous Andersonville Prison during the Civil War at about age 18. Read more about him on the Seeney Civil War Page) . Jane born 1822 and Rebecca born in 1827 are still mysteries. They were living and unmarried in 1860 but that is all that is known at this time.

There was a boy about 10 years old living with Rhoda in 1840 but that is all that is known about him. Was he a son or grandson ?

James born about 1820 and died about 1890. He appears to have been married twice. First to Sarah Grenage on November 2,1844 in Kent County, Delaware. The children were Rhoda, Melvina, John, Elizabeth, Samuel, Sallie and Adeline. In the 1850 and 1860 Census the family is listed as Mulatto.

James had another wife named Sallie Clark. They were probably married in the early 1860s. Their children were Joseph, Frederick H., William and James,Jr. (At about age 82 James, Jr. was described as a patriarchical man with white silky hair, white mustache and a yellowish complexion. He stated he had always heard that he had Indian blood in his ancestry.)

Frederick H. is the only one we know much about at this time. He was born in 1866 and died in 1925. He lived in central Delaware and started the Forest Grove Adventist Church in Cheswold. He married Hester Dean about 1882. (Visit Dean Family History). Their children were James Clifford, Myrella, Russell, Sophia, Herbert, Frederick Aubrey, Orville, Harold, Dolly, Adeline, Myrtle and Paul. The last four children probably all died before 1925.

James Clifford lived from 1892 to 1965. His branch moved to Battle Creek, Michigan. A lot is known about them.

Myrella we know married a William Durham and that is all presently known.
Russell we have no information on at all.

Sophia married a Robert Luckett.

Herbert lived from 1883 until 1969. His branch moved to New Jersey.
Frederick Aubrey we know was born May 20,1888 and was still alive in 1925.
Orville was born May 22,1903 and died November 1969 in Cheswold, Kent County, Delaware.

Harold we know was born in 1889 and was stll living in 1925.

The families that most of the Seeneys married into were of mixed racial lines. Such as the Deans, Honeys, Grenages, Durhams and Moors. Some descendants have proudly proclaimed their mixed heritage of White, African-American, Delaware Indian and Moor. Others apparently have not. You can read about these families at the Mitsawokett Main Page website. It is very interesting reading.

The origin of the non-white Moors/Moores of Maryland and Delaware begins back in the 1600s. For a number of great newspaper articles about them you should visit The Delaware Moors . Or read about the beginnings of the area they lived in by going to the Mitsawoket/Cheswold Community pages.

One great story passed down is about an English Infantry Regiment called "Kirke's Lambs" stationed in Tangiers, Morocco. In 1684 they were downsized by the British Army. And for some reason a lot of them decided to head for the colonies instead of returning home. (Visit the site called Kirke's Lambs for their complete history.)

They ended up taking over an island in the Chesapeake Bay and called it Tangier Island. The British ex-soldiers brought with them Moorish wives, girlfriends and probably servants and/or slaves. The single Moors migrated into Maryland Eastern Shore area and Delaware usually marrying Indians or Free Blacks. Whereas the ones that were married to the British ex-soldiers in some cases had non-white looking offspring that carried English surnames. (Morgan, Ridgeway, Durham, Dean, Carney). Depending on the marriages in later generations the complexions grew lighter or darker. So by the 1800s census takers made the decision as to list them as White, Non-White, Black or Indian.

Rhoda's grandson, James said that his grandmother had been white. But, a story passed down from the same generation said that an ancester was a Moorish prince that had been held as a slave.

There was a book written in the 1940s that had information about the Delaware Seeneys. It was called Delaware's Forgotten Folk written by Dr. Clinton A. Weslager.

---------------

Notes by Dr. Clinton A. Weslager, about 1941/42: "I then interviewed James Seeney. He is the oldest Seeney living and the Grand Uncle of Dalton. James is the son of James, Sr. and his mother was a Clark. James, Jr. is one of six sons: John, Samuel, Federick, William, James, and Joseph Seeney.
"James Sr.'s mother was Rhoda Moore before she married into the Seeney family, and was said to have been a white woman. She appears to be a relative of the white Moore family of Cheswold. James is a very patriarchal man with white silky hair, white mustache and a yellowish complexion and very religious. He has eaten no meat for 40 years as part of his faith. He is a carpenter and has worked hard all his life. He said his father and grandfather were both from the neighborhood of Cheswold and the Seeney's did not come from Maryland as I had previously heard. He said he had heard of Indian blood in his family but couldn't contribute any important information."

"James Seeney told me that his brother Federick Seeney founded the Adventist Church in Cheswold about 35 years ago (this was in 1941 when I recorded this) and that the Rev. Elder Frank, a white man, held a revival meeting in a tent in Kenton, Delaware. Seeney got religion at this meeting and brought it back to Cheswold. At first only the Seeney family were Adventist, but the faith spread to other families. The Forest Grove Adventist Church has about 36 members. This story about the origin of the Adventist Church was confirmed to me by G.A. Mosley."


6. Jane Seeney

http://members.aol.com/DL7715/Seeney.html
Updated 12/12/98

Rhoda was born about 1785 in Delaware and died after 1860 in Delaware.
She was married to a Seaney about 1804. Her husband apparently died
prior to 1840. Unfortunately his first name is still unknown. She was listed as mulatto in the 1850 and 1860 Censuses.

Their children appear to be : Isaac, Washington, James, Samuel, Jane,
Rebecca and an unknown male born about 1832.

Jane born 1822 and Rebecca born in 1827 are still mysteries. They were
living and unmarried in 1860 but that is all that is known at this time.


7. Rebecca Seeney

http://members.aol.com/DL7715/Seeney.html
Updated 12/12/98

Rhoda was born about 1785 in Delaware and died after 1860 in Delaware.
She was married to a Seaney about 1804. Her husband apparently died
prior to 1840. Unfortunately his first name is still unknown. She was listed as mulatto in the 1850 and 1860 Censuses.

Their children appear to be : Isaac, Washington, James, Samuel, Jane,
Rebecca and an unknown male born about 1832.

Jane born 1822 and Rebecca born in 1827 are still mysteries. They were
living and unmarried in 1860 but that is all that is known at this time.


8. Caleb Sena

Family History Report from Dave Seeney 12 Sep 2000: MIGHT be related.


9. Seeney

http://members.aol.com/DL7715/Seeney.html
Updated 12/12/98



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